Thursday, August 17, 2017

Prepare for the Total Solar Eclipse!

On Monday, August 21, all of North America will be able to witness a total eclipse of the sun! This is a big deal for many citizens of the US, since the last eclipse many Americans were able to experience, happened back in 1979. To refresh your knowledge on all things space, see our list of books to keep you company until you whip out your eclipse glasses on Monday!



Astrology for All by Alan Leo

He is considered the father of modern astrology: Alan Leo opened up the secrets of divination by the stars to the general public in the early 20th century with a popular line of astrology manuals that set off a craze for horoscopes that continues to this day. Here, in this replica of the 1910 fourth edition of his essential primer, Leo teaches us: the basics of astronomy required for an understanding of astrology, the nature and character of the twelve signs of the Zodiac, complete breakdowns of the affect of the Sun and the Moon on each house, what a horoscope is and how to cast one, and much more!




The Story of Astrology by Manly Palmer Hall

In this concise book, one of the preeminent metaphysicists of the 20th century gives us an extraordinarily informative and entertaining survey of the astrological disciplines and beliefs of the ancient Chinese, Tibetans, Hindus, Greeks, Romans, Aztecs, and Arabians. Then, his discussions of astrology as science, religion, and philosophy bring this paranormal system into the contemporary world, and he explains how, in his estimation, that the heavenly bodies, acting as the "foci of intellectual energy," dramatically sway the course of civilization itself. A classic of supernatural spirituality is a must-read for those fascinated by the influence of paranormal belief in the 20th century.





This charming introduction to astrology, first published in 1913 and difficult to find in print again until now, initiates the novice into the mysteries of the zodiac through a series of questions (with answers, of course!), such as: "Why should Astrology be known as the Law which governs the Solar system, and consequently our individual lives?", "Is it not supposed that the Pyramids were built especially for Astrological purposes?", "Which planet is said to represent "Evil" in the greatest degree?", "Is it not true that Planets have to go through the same kind of Pilgrimage as Humans"?, and many more. Discover the power of reading the stars... or get a new perspective on this ancient art.




From the Earth to the Moon and 'Round the Moon by Jules Verne

This is the legendary novel of technological speculation and social satire that launched an entire genre of adventure fiction: Verne's From the Earth to the Moon and 'Round the Moon is the first story of space exploration and remains a beloved work of daring exploits—and surprisingly accurate scientific conjecture. When the members of the Baltimore Gun Club—bored Civil War veterans—decide to fill their time by embarking on a project to shoot themselves to the moon, the race is on to raise money, overcome engineering challenges, and convince detractors that they're anything but "Lunatics." With this work, Verne inspired the first science fiction film, 1902's Le Voyage dans la lune, and accurately predicted that that ideal location for a spacebase is in Florida.











Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Congrats Henry David Thoreau!

This month, Cosimo is celebrating everything Henry David Thoreau with the recent release of the brand new United States Post Office Thoreau Forever Stamps!


“Thoreau was one of the great thinkers in this country’s history on a wide variety of subjects, and the expression on his face in the stamp image captures his introspective and inquisitive nature,” said U.S. Postal Service General Counsel and Executive Vice President Thomas J. Marshall. “Thoreau encouraged everyone to lead more thoughtful and considered lives. Given the pace of today’s world, the many demands on our time, and sometimes conflicting priorities, I am sure we could all benefit from his advice.”

Congrats Thoreau!

Walden by Henry David Thoreau

This is one of the most important works by the most important American philosopher: Henry David Thoreau, vital figure in the Transcendentalist movement, hero to environmentalists and ecologists, profound thinker on humanity's happiness. First published in 1854, Walden collects the penetrating reflections from the two years Thoreau lived in solitude on the shores of Massachusetts' Walden Pond. In lucid, poetic prose, Thoreau ponders the beauty of living simply and in communion with nature. It is a work of pastoral magnificence and wisdom that has moved generations of readers.







The Maine Woods by Henry David Thoreau

In 1846, Thoreau took the first of his three journeys into the woods of Maine, and each of his excursions, he pondered the allure of the wild, the impact of humanity, and on being a man moving through nature. Here, his thoughts on all three trips are gathering in one volume-first published in 1864-that is considered by some one of the best examples of outdoors writing ever. From the quiet of a lakeside to the campfire stewing of cranberries to surprising encounters with Indians, Thoreau offers us an intimate look at a landscape that is now all but gone, or radically different. His insights on his experiences, which have made him a hero to environmentalists and ecologists, are even more powerful today than perhaps they were when he first put them down on paper.



Walking by Henry David Thoreau

The philosophies of Thoreauhero to environmentalists and ecologists, profound thinker on humanity's happiness — have greatly influenced the American character, and his writings on human nature, materialism, and the natural world continue to be of profound import today. In this essay, first published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1862 and vital to any appreciation of the great man's work, Thoreau explores: the joys and necessities of long afternoon walks, how spending time in untrammeled fields and woods soothes the spirit, how Nature guides us on our walks, the lure of the wild for writers and artists,  why "all good things are wild and free," and more.




Cape Cod by Henry David Thoreau

The writer himself once said, "I am eager to report the glory of the universe," and in this delightful worknot published till 1865, after his deathhe regales us with tales of his time on Massachusetts' Cape Cod, to where he journeyed four times between 1849 and 1857. While still profoundly philosophical, this is Thoreau's lightest work, full of amusing and reflective anecdotes about the wildlife, human inhabitants, and fishing industry that characterized the island of the day. Charming and provocative, Cape Cod will be cherished by readers of modern philosophies and armchair travelers alike.








Thursday, August 10, 2017

August Classic of the Month: A Vindication of the Rights of Women

In the spirit of Women's Equality Day, (selected to commemorate the 1920 certification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote.) Cosimo's Classic of the Month is A Vindication of the Rights of Women by Mary Wollstonecraft as our Classic of the Month.

This 1792 book is one of the earliest works of protofeminist thought and is the first published argument advocating for the societal elevation of women as the intellectual and emotional equals of men. Written during the time of the French Revolution, this revolutionary book reacts against the French Diplomat's, Charles Maurice's, statement that women should be educated only in domestic matters.

Well received in its day and still an important resource for anyone wishing to understand the history of feminism, this extended essay demolishes the sexual double standard of the day, offers a rational defense for the education of girls, and demands merely that women be treated as people.

A Vindication of the Rights of Women is available in hardcover and paperback at leading online bookstores, including Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

About the Author:
Mary Wollstonecraft was an eighteenth-century British writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book. Wollstonecraft is best known for A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), in which she argues that women are not naturally inferior to men, but appear to be only because they lack education. She suggests that both men and women should be treated as rational beings and imagines a social order founded on reason.



Tuesday, August 8, 2017

August Book of the Month: Founding a Movement

This August, Cosimo is celebrating women all over the world with our Book of the Month Founding a Movement: Women's World Banking, 1975-1990, a detailed history of the first global women's microfinance organizations, run by women, for women. Its history is told by founder Michaela Walsh, who was president and CEO of the company from its inception at 1975 until 1990. Chock full of interviews from the organization's first board members and participants, it follows the difficult path WWB took to recognize its dream and make small businesses a reality for so many women around the world.

Founding a Movement shows how hard work and perseverance, not to mention a helping hand from fellow entrepreneurs and business owners, can help anyone take control of their economic destinies. In the words of Michaela Walsh, this book "shines a light on the value that women contribute through work, and when they support one another, to become full participants in the economy through access to financial institutions and services, and everything that goes with that access."

About the Author
Michaela Walsh is an activist, scholar, mentor, educator, and author. She has been a pioneer female manager for Merrill Lynch, the first female partner at Boettcher, and the founding president of Women's World Banking. She has taught at Manhattanville College, served on the Boards of several institutions, and was the chairperson of the 59th United Nations DPI/NGO Conference in 2006.She has received numerous awards, including in honor an honor in 2012 from Women's Funding Network for changing the face of philanthropy.